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Anu

I like the DMI graph because they are usually the first to post the data for the current date:
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/icecover.uk.php
The graph is rather small and only goes back to 2005, but you can download it and zoom in if you want to see details better.

The IARC-JAXA graph looks better, goes back to 2002 and now has the "larger image" if you click on the small graph, but my favorite part of this site is their link to past data in numerical form:
http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/seaice/extent/plot.csv

The NSIDC graphs are nice for the inclusion of ± 2 standard deviations "gray zones" on their graphs:
http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/images/daily_images/N_stddev_timeseries.png
They also sometimes publish interesting graphs with multiple years for comparison, e.g.:
http://nsidc.org/images/arcticseaicenews/20100608_Figure2.png

The University of Bremen, Germany, graph is interesting in that it includes data back to 1972:
http://iup.physik.uni-bremen.de:8084/amsr/ice_ext_n.png
The Nimbus 5 ESMR data started from 1972.
Here’s a paper that discusses the Arctic sea ice extent in the 70′s:
http://www.tos.org/oceanography/issues/issue_archive/issue_pdfs/6_1/6.1_barry_et_al.pdf

I don't like the Arctic-ROOS site much:
http://arctic-roos.org/observations/satellite-data/sea-ice/ice-area-and-extent-in-arctic
They even get the order of annual graphs different from the other sites, while admitting that they use the same data as NSIDC and U. of Bremen, but might have implemented standard alogirithms "differently":
http://arctic-roos.org/observations/comparison-of-algorithms

Neven
but my favorite part of this site is their link to past data in numerical form:

I agree with you. The csv-file on the IJIS website allows me to track the numbers myself and report the individual differences between years in these reports. And I still think the IJIS sea ice extent graph looks nicest of all graphs out there.

while admitting that they use the same data as NSIDC and U. of Bremen, but might have implemented standard alogirithms "differently":

Don't they use data from the SMM/I sensor whereas IJIS, NSIDC and Uni Bremen use the AMSR-E data? Could this account for the differences?

Artful Dodger

Nimbus I satellite data from September 1963 has been retrieved, and is now available in a newly published paper (freely available PDF is here).

Meier, W. N., D. Gallaher, and G. G. Campbell. "New estimates of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice extent during September 1964 from recovered Nimbus I satellite imagery." The Cryosphere Discuss 7 (2013): 35-53.

NIMBUS I

New results are provided for end of Summer Arctic SIE (about the same as 1979-2000), and end of Winter Antarctic SIE (significantly higher than 1979-2000).

Cheers,
Lodger

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