« Race to Fram Strait 2 | Main | Sea ice extent update 27: nope, not a fat lady (yet) »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Kevin McKinney

I like this animation a lot. Especially interesting is the late season warming, I presume due to the loss of ice cover.

It looks like 2009 has the warmest temps at high latitudes, but 2007 has the warmer temps around the Arctic periphery--the pattern of colder temps appears to be a bit more compact on average. Eyeball Mark I, of course. . .

Artful Dodger

Hi Neven. This should be useful, along with your SST animations.

Selecting the 925mb analysis level retrieves temps for 3000 ft altitude.

https://www.boqueteweather.com/millibars_altitude.htm

It may be better to choose 'Surface', as this is most related to the sea ice.

Neven

Kevin, I have a feeling this will be the most 'boring' of all End Zone instalments. Ice displacement, later today, should be more interesting.

Lodger, I'm using 925 mb because I think I read Julienne Stroeve somewhere saying she used that for air temperature. 500 mb for SLP is the best measure, right?

Glacierchange.wordpress.com

This is unfair. My classes start tomorrow, and I am getting ready. So you post some fascinating material that will take much consideration, what to do? This is great. The core of the coldest temps seems to develop as Sept. advances over Northern Greenland and Ellesmere.

Neven

This is unfair. My classes start tomorrow, and I am getting ready. So you post some fascinating material that will take much consideration, what to do?

:-)

Show your students the End Zone-series. Start with the curriculum in October. ;-)

Artful Dodger

925 mb (2500 feet altitude) is usually above the low cloud layer, so is probably reported more reliably by satellite. Easy enough to convert from there to SLP with a 1.8C / 1000 ft adiabatic lapse rate. Be interesting to compare to the surface map...

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name is required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)