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Shared Humanity

Congrats on being recognized by the EGU press team. It certainly is a statement on how this blog is seen in the ongoing discussion of AGW.

Also, many of the poster sessions sound like the discussions we have here and on the ASIF. You are doing the world a service.

Shared Humanity

Also, a suggestion....

When you report back, it would be wonderful if you could initiate discussions on the ASIF on topics you feel this community would benefit from and contribute to. I would prefer this as opposed to you having to take on the monumental task of reporting on this amazing list of topics. It would be easier, I think, for you to introduce the topics with a short take-away and links.

Shared Humanity

One final comment.....

From the poster sessions, it would seem that the scientific community is rapidly establishing links between Arctic sea ice loss and dramatic changes in northern hemisphere weather. This is a tremendous development as the scientific community will now be able to communicate the sometimes horrific effects to the world community which can only build a consensus that....

SOMETHING MUST BE DONE!!!!!!!

VaughnA

Neven, this is a wonderful opportunity for you to really gather the information to put climate change in proper perspective(Not that you don't do a great job already!) Hopefully you will reconsider going to more than just one day.

I have been to two Nation Science Teachers of America symposiums...one in Portland, Oregon USA and the other in San Jose, California USA. That was a few years ago(circa 2001-2003) but I consider attending these to be high points in my life. The volume of information scientists were publishing at that time about recent different studies and research was truly overwhelming.

http://www.nsta.org/

The American Chemical Society had a few presentations about atmospheric and oceanic effects of man-made greenhouse chemicals and how they were working to reduce the use of these. What I came away with from them was about things I didn't even know that I didn't even know existed about the monumental and subtle effects of some of these chemicals on earth's climate.

https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en.html

One other important thing I brought from these symposiums was the effects of so many seemingly innocuous things and how they affect climate. The sheer volume and variety of information helped me put a few things together quickly which otherwise may have never happened at all.

One suggestion: Take pictures of the posters if allowed. If you run out of time looking at all of them you can look at the pictures later.

Ac A

Neven,

if you meet Brad Werner, send him a greetings ;-)

AGU Scientist Asks, ‘Is Earth F**ked?’

Alex

Espen Olsen

Very interesting: Just have one question for the
"No slowing down of Jakobshavn Isbræ in 2014: Results from
feature-tracking five Greenland outlet glaciers using Landsat-8 data and
the ImGRAFT toolbox"
presentation?

Why is there no mention about Zachariae Isstrøm? (more important than most of the other glaciers observed, at least compared to 79?)

Boa05att

Hey Neven,

I'm going to be there too! I'm intending to sit in on the Polar Climate Predictability and Prediction session as well.

Who knows maybe we'll bump into each other.


If you can make it you would probably like this session on Wednesday afternoon:

CL2.6
Arctic climate change: governing mechanisms and global implications

http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2015/orals/17048

Neven
If you can make it you would probably like this session on Wednesday afternoon:

I hadn't even seen that one. Too bad I can't go on Wednesday too.

Who knows maybe we'll bump into each other.

That'd be fun. I have only meet two ASIB commenters so far. I've shaven my head yesterday, not completely, still 13 mm of hair. So now you know what to look for, and my badge, of course. ;-)

I would prefer this as opposed to you having to take on the monumental task of reporting on this amazing list of topics. It would be easier, I think, for you to introduce the topics with a short take-away and links.

I don't know yet what I'll report. I'm going there for the experience mostly.

if you meet Brad Werner, send him a greetings ;-)

AGU Scientist Asks, ‘Is Earth F**ked?’

I will, but what do I tell him? ;-)

Neven, this is a wonderful opportunity for you to really gather the information to put climate change in proper perspective(Not that you don't do a great job already!) Hopefully you will reconsider going to more than just one day.

Thanks, Vaughn. Maybe I'll go two days next year.

Tor Bejnar

Thanks for mentioning Steve Bloom; I've wondered what happened. Whatever the challenges, I wish him well.

I went to a couple Int. Geol. Congresses (Prague 1968, Sydney 1976) and learned a lot (including the affect Russian tanks have on different types of pavement).

Have a grand time, Neven. So much will come your way, I suspect, that jotting or recording notes to remind you of highlights that might get lost under subsequent highlights might help.

wayne

Very educational subjects Neven,

but none more if data comes strait from the sea ice itself, perhaps all these experts may be interested in knowing we can literally see when sea ice starts to melt:


http://eh2r.blogspot.ca/2015/04/first-high-arctic-underside-melt-2015.html

I like it a lot when nature draws a significant line.

Kevin McKinney

Hope you have a great time at the conference, Neven. I know you'll be letting us know what was most striking in due course!

Neven

I've just returned from Vienna, and it was as awesome as I had hoped it would be. But intense too! I was so focused on the Arctic sea ice stuff, that I was overwhelmed when I saw all those people and hundreds of posters. My first thought, when coming out of the garage into the main hall, actually was: "Why are there so many people here? Are they all here for the Arctic sea ice?". ;-)

I'll write a short summary of what I've seen and heard (and some news I'm allowed to divulge, although the BBC gets the exclusive ;-) ) this weekend. It was great fun and well worth the drive.

Cryospheric science rocks!!!

Boa05att

Hi Neven,

Sorry I missed you. I'm glad you had a good time. It is a bit overwhelming isn't it!

Is this the BBC scoop you were mentioning? :-)

'3D Cryosat' tracks Arctic winter sea ice
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-32348291

Neven

Hi, Boa05att,

Unfortunately I missed the morning session because my wife had a doctor appointment she couldn't postpone. Maybe next time we should make more of an effort to meet. ;-)

Yes, that's the scoop. CryoSat now has maps!

Andy Lee Robinson

Good job Neven!
Damn! I didn't notice this post in time otherwise I would also have paid a visit - Vienna is also a couple of hours away from Budapest.
Next time!

Neven

Maybe next year, Andy. :-)

Here's a long summary of my impressions that I've just posted.

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